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What Are You Doing to WOW Your Staff Members?

What Are You Doing to WOW Your Staff Members?

It can be easy to take them for granted, especially if you’ve been working together for a while. But don’t make that mistake. Sure, there should be a comfort level, but you don’t want that to turn into complacency. Because if you as the practice owner are going through the motions, your team will likely do the same.

Staff members, no matter how long they’ve been with the practice, want to be inspired about what they do. Here are five ways to motivate your team and yourself

1. Be the Example

Your team is looking to you for cues on how to act while at work. If you talk badly about patients or display a negative attitude or regularly come in late, you’re telling your team by your actions they can do the same.

Being the example literally means being the example. Sit down and make a list of the five most important traits you would like to see in your team. Then display those traits every single day. Think of it as a self-improvement checklist. You may even want to rate yourself in each category at the end of the day. It’s a technique I’ve used to help myself improve in targeted areas.

2. Display a Positive Attitude at All Times

Admittedly, that’s not always easy. You could have a ton of stuff going on at home––a child having trouble at school, a parent in the hospital, marital issues, etc., but you’ve got to leave all that behind and put your best face forward.

Every morning find a way to get into a positive frame of mind––even if you have to fake it sometimes. A positive attitude is one of the most powerful ways to reach your own potential and motivate the people around you. People like consistent leaders and they love someone who displays positivity day in day out. They know they can count on it regardless of what’s happening in the rest of their lives.

3. Appreciate the Team for Doing Normal Things

In business and sports, people are often publicly rewarded for exceptional performance… the Most Valuable Player, Most Improved, Highest Scorer, etc.  In real life, leadership is about showing the team gratitude and appreciation for the things they routinely do every day. The more  recognition and compliments you give out, the more motivated people will be.

4. Demonstrate High Energy Every Day

Not everyone is a cheerleader or a rah-rah person. I’m not suggesting you should run around your practice like some over-caffeinated infomercial spokesperson, but I am suggesting that displaying energy is powerful. When you have high energy, it’s contagious. You can walk into most dental practices and feel the energy level––good or bad. People with high energy are more likable, more influential and more productive.

5. Have an Open Door Policy

Approachable leaders are powerful leaders. When team members feel they can talk to the doctor about anything, they are comfortable, looking to improve and often ask questions to enhance performance. When you are accessible to your team on a regular basis, they will appreciate it, admire you and want to perform better.

Conclusion

Even the best teams can underperform at times. Use these five techniques to keep your team focused and inspired!

 


Additional Resources

Read “3 Habits of Happy Dentists.

Check out Dr. Levin’s e-book “What Dentists Can Learn from Top CEOs.” Save 25% with code TOD25.

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How to Create a Happier Team in 4 Easy Steps

How to Create a Happier Team in 4 Easy Steps

Team dynamics have a profound impact on practice success. If your team is miserable, you’re probably going to be miserable, too.

Over the years, I’ve met more than a few dentists who had an adversarial relationship with their staff. Some doctors resent the whole idea of having a team, and that resentment shines through in their interactions with staff members, many of whom eventually leave. Those who stay are disgruntled, which makes the dentist resent them even more. Eventually, everyone in the practice gets pulled into an endless vortex of negativity.

Fortunately, most dental practices don’t suffer from that kind of toxic culture. But, on the other hand, many dental teams aren’t operating at optimal levels either.

There are always opportunities to improve the environment in your practice. What can you do as the practice leader to build a better team and a better workplace? Here are some suggestions:

1) Listen More

Your team is largely running the practice. They see what’s working and what can be improved upon. Their ideas can be the catalysts for positive change. Not every suggestion is going to be a home run, but listening to their input shows that you value their opinions. People are more engaged in their jobs when they believe they can make a difference.

2) Empower Your Team

If a team member has a suggestion for improving the practice and it’s a project that you agree with, give the employee the authority to make it happen. Saying “yes” is a powerful tool for gaining “buy-in” from staff members. Obviously, you can’t say “yes” to every idea, but when you can, you should.

3) Share the Vision

Do you have a practice vision? It’s a written document that is your projection of where the practice will be in 3–5 years. If you have one, share it with the team. This will inspire them to move the practice forward and achieve challenging goals. It also helps turn a group of individuals into a cohesive team. If you don’t have a practice vision, it’s time to create one.

4) Surprise Them

Predictability can be good. Everybody knows what to expect and things run smoothly. Yet if the days are too similar, people can become bored. Lead the fight against complacency by surprising your team every now and then. Once a quarter, take your team out to lunch… throw a party… hand out gift cards to a local eatery. Do something out of the ordinary that makes working in your practice a little more fun.

Conclusion

Building a good team is difficult, but keeping them together is even harder. Use these four steps to engage, empower, inspire and surprise your staff!

 


Additional Resources

Read “3 Strategies for Hiring the Right People. 

New Seminar: Learn more team-building strategies at Dr. Levin’s upcoming seminar “The Mid-Career Plateau: How to Avoid It, Overcome It, Get Out of It” on Oct. 6 in Indianapolis.

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3 Surefire Ways to Lose Good Employees

3 Surefire Ways to Lose Good Employees

Your team plays a critical role in the success of your practice. They help you get you through the tough days and prevent the tough days from turning into something much worse. Yet, many dentists have trouble keeping quality team members.

Sure, people will move or change careers. But many good employees leave because they were driven away by a boss’ bad behavior. According to a 2015 Gallup poll, about half of workers left their job because of their supervisor.

It’s getting harder to find good team members. Once you develop someone, you don’t want to lose them due to bad habits or bad leadership.

Here are 3 ways to NOT to retain a good staff member:

1. Play Favorites

People don’t want to work in a practice where they’re treated like a second-class citizen just because they’re not Brenda or Bobby or whoever is the doctor’s best buddy. When one employee gets special privileges, it creates unnecessary tension and resentment.

Solution: Strive to treat everyone fairly and equally.

2. Don’t Recognize Good Effort

Many dentists don’t compliment their team because they believe that “doing a good job is what I pay them for.” If you rarely praise your team, it might be time to rethink that behavior. Everybody needs encouragement, acknowledgement and positive feedback. When staff members are never praised, they tend to become complacent and go through the motions.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying applaud poor work or underachievement. But the vast majority of dental team members do a good job. Letting your staff know that is a good thing. People want to be compensated well, but they also want to work in an environment where they’re appreciated.

Solution: Make appreciation a daily activity.

3. Fail to Keep Your Promises

Practice leaders can quickly demoralize their team by making promises they don’t keep. Your word should be your bond. If you’re viewed as untrustworthy, your team will doubt nearly everything you say.

Solution: If you make a promise to your team, do everything in your power to keep it.

Conclusion

If you have good staff members, you want to retain them. You don’t want to be the kind of boss that drives people away. Avoid these three costly errors and continue to strengthen your team by giving them the training they need.


Additional Resources

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