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Archive for category: GP Tips

Be what you want your patients to be.

Be what you want your patients to be. Leadership is about setting an example. If you want pleasant patients, be pleasant. If you want patients to smile at you, smile at them. If you want energetic patients, be energetic. People mirror other people. It is amazing when you watch two people how one will gradually take on the characteristics, body language, and even tone of voice of the other. They don’t even realize they are doing it.

Whitepaper Wednesday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Level IV Leadership,” by clicking here.

Advice for the Dentist – Educate patients about implants.

Advice for the Dentist – Educate patients about implants. Inform patients about implants and their many benefits by providing brochures, fact sheets and other materials… and by answering their questions (both asked and unasked). This will make case presentation easier and increase the likelihood of patients saying “Yes” to implant treatment.

Additional Resource: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, The Implant Treatment Coordinator (ITC) by clicking here.

Be prepared to help patients with their dental insurance.

Be prepared to help patients with their dental insurance. You can assume that many patients will not understand their insurance or even how to work with their dental insurance company. They may even think that their dental insurance works the same way as medical insurance. The practice should be prepared and anticipate that they will need to help patients through the process. Practices that do will have higher production, higher case acceptance, and more patients.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Learn from Ritz Carlton,” by clicking here.

Dental assistants should check in with patients every five minutes.

Dental assistants should check in with patients every five minutes. Part of the dental assistant role is to provide a Five-Star Customer Service experience. Asking patients questions such as “How are you doing? or… Is there anything I can do to make you more comfortable?” every five minutes helps to create a great experience and increase patient confidence.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “The New Hygiene Appointment” by clicking here.

When things go wrong, maintain composure.

When things go wrong, maintain composure. There will be the occasional bad day, difficult patient, wrecked schedule, or sick staff member… all of which increase stress. In the face of adversity, remain calm. Your fellow team members are counting on you to handle the situation. A calm demeanor allows you to respond appropriately to stressful situations.

Additional Resource: Read a FREE excerpt from Dr. Levin’s book, “Essential Scripts For Patient Communication,” by clicking here.

Communicate collection policies clearly.

Communicate collection policies clearly. All practice systems relating to the collection of fees should be detailed in writing. This should then be translated into scripts that the financial coordinator—as well as other staff members—can use to educate patients about their obligations. Scripts not only make it easier to discuss what for some is an uncomfortable subject, but also ensure greater consistency in what patients are told.

Additional Resource: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, 3 Simple Steps To Reach The Next Level by clicking here.

Set aside time every week to work on the practice.

Set aside time every week to work on the practice. Most of the time dentists and team members put all of their energies into patient care and administrative duties. Always make time to step back and think about how to improve your practice. Highly successful practices focus not only on how to work in the practice, but also how to work on it.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Wherever You Are Today, You Won’t Be There Tomorrow,” by clicking here.

Never ignore patients when you’re running behind.

Never ignore patients when you’re running behind. When you’re running late should you keep the patient informed, or simply have them sit there wondering what’s happening? The obvious answer is to keep them up-to-date, but at busy front desks this often unnoticed. When you’re behind schedule, apologizing to patients and keeping them informed lets them know you’re focused on them. This makes all the difference in patient satisfaction.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “New Patient Experience At The Front Desk” by clicking here.

When things go wrong, maintain composure.

When things go wrong, maintain composure. There will be the occasional bad day, difficult patient, wrecked schedule, or sick staff member… all of which increase stress. In the face of adversity, remain calm. Your fellow team members are counting on you to handle the situation. A calm demeanor allows you to respond appropriately to stressful situations.

Additional Resource: Read a FREE excerpt from Dr. Levin’s book, “What to Say, What Not to Say,” by clicking here.

Go and get grab your copy now!