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Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals. Daily goals should be set to achieve the annual production goal. For example, if the practice wants to produce $800,000 in 200 workdays, the office needs to schedule $4,000 per day. While practices won’t be able to achieve this exact number each day, it’s a goal every team member can strive for.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Goal Setting – A Critical CEO Function,” by clicking here.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals. Daily goals should be set to achieve the annual production goal. For example, if the practice wants to produce $800,000 in 200 workdays, the office needs to schedule $4,000 per day. While practices won’t be able to achieve this exact number each day, it’s a goal every team member can strive for.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Goal Setting – A Critical CEO Function,” by clicking here.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals. Daily goals should be set to achieve the annual production goal. For example, if the practice wants to produce $800,000 in 200 workdays, the office needs to schedule $4,000 per day. While practices won’t be able to achieve this exact number each day, it’s a goal every team member can strive for.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Goal Setting – A Critical CEO Function,” by clicking here.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals. Daily goals should be set to achieve the annual production goal. For example, if the practice wants to produce $800,000 in 200 workdays, the office needs to schedule $4,000 per day. While practices won’t be able to achieve this exact number each day, it’s a goal every team member can strive for.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Goal Setting – A Critical CEO Function,” by clicking here.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals.

Align the practice’s annual and daily production goals. Daily goals should be set to achieve the annual production goal. For example, if the practice wants to produce $800,000 in 200 workdays, the office needs to schedule $4,000 per day. While practices won’t be able to achieve this exact number each day, it’s a goal every team member can strive for.

Management Monday: Check out Dr. Levin’s whitepaper, “Goal Setting – A Critical CEO Function,” by clicking here.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit. If you’re making changes based on patient feedback, let patients know that you’re responding to—and appreciate—their suggestions. This will demonstrate that you value their opinions highly and will also encourage them to offer more improvement ideas.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “Feedback Loops” by clicking here.

When you make improvements suggested by parents, give them credit.

When you make improvements suggested by parents, give them credit. If you’re making changes based on parent feedback, let parents know that you’re responding to—and appreciate—their suggestions. This will demonstrate that you value their opinions highly and will also encourage them to offer more improvement ideas.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “Feedback Loops” by clicking here.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit. If you’re making changes based on patient feedback, let patients know that you’re responding to—and appreciate—their suggestions. This will demonstrate that you value their opinions highly and will also encourage them to offer more improvement ideas.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “Feedback Loops” by clicking here.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit. If you’re making changes based on patient feedback, let patients know that you’re responding to—and appreciate—their suggestions. This will demonstrate that you value their opinions highly and will also encourage them to offer more improvement ideas.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “Feedback Loops” by clicking here.

When you make improvements suggested by parent and patients, give them credit.

When you make improvements suggested by patients, give them credit. If you’re making changes based on parent and patient feedback, let parents and patients know that you’re responding to—and appreciate—their suggestions. This will demonstrate that you value their opinions highly and will also encourage them to offer more improvement ideas.

Friday Freebie: Watch Dr. Levin’s video, “Feedback Loops” by clicking here.

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